The Good, the Bad and the Beautiful – May 2013

This edition of GB&B is brought to you from my garden at home.

The Good

I made some changes last year. I shrank borders to make them more workable in the time I have, turning some areas over to rough grass and this has worked well. The beds are in need of weeding but this month I’ve actually enjoyed chilling out in my own garden, rather than allowing it to become job #2. Hurrah! Success!

So what does this success look like? Nothing like a Chelsea show garden that’s for sure:

Huechera, geum and garden fork.

The fork being lazy – shameless!

Crab apple 'John Downie'

Crab apple ‘John Downie’ and the tree trunk seat.

Apple tree with three varieties - Gala, Lord Lambourne and Egremont's Russet.

Apple tree with three varieties – Gala, Lord Lambourne and Egremont’s Russet.

This family tree (a tree with several varieties grafted onto one trunk) is really nice but was discontinued after I bought it and now I think I see why – the Lord Lambourne branch is vastly outgrowing the others but bears a lot less fruit. I was pleased to get it because these are my three favourite apple varieties but next time I’ll know to enquire more deeply – a great idea for a small space though.

Veg beds

My raised beds.

The veg was planted up a bit late this year thanks to weather and busyness but now they’re done. I cheated by buying module grown veg but given the busyness and not having a greenhouse at home it seemed the most sensible way so now I have tasty things to look forward to.

And my monster of a lilac is looking awesome in the background.

The Bad

Snails! Sorry to be a broken record on the topic but just take a look at my beans:

Snail damage on beans

Horrible little snailses have been hungry.

In all honesty the little blue pellets don’t seem to help much but I keep trying.

The Beautiful

Papaver orientale - unknown variety.

Papaver orientale – unknown variety.

The label for this lovely poppy has disappeared. I remember choosing it for the fact it looks rather like a bigger version of the field poppy and really wish I could remember the variety! It lacks the black blotches of ‘Beauty of Livermere’ and my Google-fu is currently failing me. Anyway, whatever it is, it’s currently making a glorious display all round the crab apple tree.

 

 

 

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8 responses to “The Good, the Bad and the Beautiful – May 2013

  1. Libby – not really a criticism, but why on earth don’t you use larger photographs? I have to peer at the screen.
    I have snail problems for the first time in ages (must be climate change). They are eating all the leaf and flower buds off the clematis. Only solution is to encourage thrushes to your garden. They adore snails!

    • Sorry! I’ll pop and change it – you’re right. I think I need a new theme anyway to be honest which would help larger pics to fit in.

    • Hmm it won’t let me make them bigger (smaller, yes, bigger, no) if I edit the post. So they’ll have to stay small but I’ll bear it in mind for next post. 🙂

  2. Few things are more beautiful about red poppies. Snails are bad (not a problem here), but could be worse: try deer.

    • Oh you poor dear.

      Sorry couldn’t help it. 😉

      Deer must be up there with badgers and horsetail. Snails are merely the ground elder of the pest world, but blimmin’ annoying all the same.

      Poppies are one of the happiest plants around in my humble opinion. It’s a shame the flowers are quite short lived, but if they were a long-lasting flowers we would be spoilt!

  3. I meant more beautiful than red poppies.

  4. Libby: if you go to ‘Settings/media’, WP allows you to specify the maximum size for small/medium/large pix. Maybe your ‘maximum’ is set too low? This may not work in your theme, of course, but it does for mine, and it seems to be a generic WP feature. Worth looking at?

    • Thanks that’s interesting. It’s doesn’t seem to work in retrospect (i.e. past posts haven’t changed) so I’ll see how it works out next time I post.

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